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The Sydney Harbour Bridge

RRP $19.95

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On 19 March, 1932, after nine years of planning and building, more than a million Australians crossed the newly opened Sydney Harbour Bridge, the largest arch bridge in the world. This revised edition of Peter Spearitt's biography of the Bridge celebrates the 80th anniversary of the Sydney Harbour Bridge in March 2012. It tells the extraordinary story of the Bridge's design and construction, the drama of its official opening, and the way it has taken a central place in Sydney's celebrations and become a much-loved symbol of the city. The Bridge has inspired great art and drawn visitors from all over the world to marvel and climb it, yet is still so familiar that Sydneysiders refer to it endearingly as the coathanger. The Sydney Harbour Bridge celebrates not only a magnificent structure, but the people who use it.

About the Author

Peter Spearritt is a leading historian, the former executive director of the Brisbane Institute, and a current professor at the University of Queensland. He has published more than 20 books, including Australians and the Monarchy, Electrifying Sydney, Sydney’s Century: A History, Holiday Business: Tourism in Australia since 1870, and Trading Places: Australian Travel Posters.


30 Days In Sydney

RRP $23.99

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Novelist Peter Carey draws the reader into a wild and wonderful journey of discovery and re-discovery of Sydney.

After living in New York for ten years novelist Peter Carey returned home to Sydney with the idea of capturing its ebullient character via the four elements. 'I would never seek to define Manhattan by asking my New York friends for stories of Earth and Air and Fire and Water,' he writes, 'but that is exactly what was in my mind as I walked through immigration at Kingsford Smith International Airport.'

Carey draws the reader helplessly into a wild and wonderful journey of discovery and re-discovery. Reading this book is a very physical experience, as bracing as the southerly buster that sometimes batters Sydney's beauteous shores. Famous visual extravaganzas such as Bondi Beach, the Opera House, the Harbour Bridge and the Blue Mountains all take on a strange new intensity when exposed to the penetrating gaze of Peter and his friends.

Thirty Days in Sydney offers the reader a private glimpse behind the glittering facades and venetian blinds. It will exhilarate and enchant all who visit.

About the Author

Peter Carey was born in 1943 in Australia and lives in New York. He is the author of the highly acclaimed selection of short stories, The Fat Man in History, nine previous novels, Bliss, Illywhacker (shortlisted for the 1985 Booker Prize), Oscar and Lucinda (winner of the 1988 Booker Prize), The Tax Inspector, The Unusual Life of Tristan Smith, Jack Maggs (winner of the 1998 Commonwealth Writers Prize), True History of the Kelly Gang (winner of the 2001 Booker Prize), My Life as a Fake, Theft, a book for children, The Big Bazoohley, and a work of non-fiction, Wrong About Japan.


A Short History Of The Renaissance In Italy

RRP $13.99

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The Renaissance spawned the use of the label "Renaissance Man" to describe a person who is extremely talented in multiple fields, and no discussion of the Renaissance is complete without the original "Renaissance Man", Leonardo da Vinci. Indeed, if 100 people are asked to describe Leonardo in one word, they might give 100 answers. As the world's most famous polymath and genius, Leonardo found time to be a painter, sculptor, architect, musician, scientist, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer. It's possible that Michelangelo is the most famous artist in history, but it's also possible that he's an underrated artist. The vast influence of his career is reflected by the fact that he is not only known for his own art but has also come to embody an entire epoch of Western art. Along with Leonardo da Vinci, there are no other artists who so fully capture the spirit of scientific and artistic discovery that characterized art during the late 15th and early 16th centuries. Moreover, Michelangelo's career is distinguished from that of his peers through his seamless ability to work within different art forms, receiving acclaim regardless of the medium.From the intro:"The word Renaissance has of late years received a more extended significance than that which is implied in our English equivalent - the Revival of Learning. We use it to denote the whole transistion from the Middle Ages to the Modern World; and though it is possible to assign certain limits to the period during which this transition took place, we cannot fix on any dats so positively as to say-between this year and that the movement was accomplished. In like manger we cannot refer the whole phenomena of the Renaissance to any one cause or circumstance, or limit them within the field of anyone one department of human knowledge. If we ask the students of art what they mean by the Renaissance, they will reply that it was the revolution effect in architecture, painting, and sculpture by the recovery of antique monuments. Students of literature, philosophy, and theology see in the Renaissance that discovery of manuscripts, that passion for antiquity, that progress in philology and criticism which led to a correct knowledge of the classics, to a fresh taste in poetry, to new systems of thought, to more accurate analysis, and, finally, to the Lutheran schism and the emancipation of the conscience. Men of science will discourse about the discovery of the solar system by Copernicus and Galileo, the anatomy of Vesalius, and Harvey's theory of the circulation of the blood. The origination of a truly scientific method is the point which interests them most in the Renaissance. The political historian, again, has his own answer to the question. The extinction of feudalism, the development of the great nationalities of Europe, the growth of monarchy, the limitation of ecclesiastical authority and the erection of the Papacy into an Italian kingdom, and, in the last place, the gradual emergence of that sense of popular freedom which exploded in the Revolution: these are the aspects of the movement which engross his attention. Jurists will describe the dissolution of legal fictions based upon the false decrials, the acquisition of a true text of the Roman Code, and the attempt to introduce a rational method into the theory of modem jurisprudence, as well as to commence the study of international law. Men whose attention has been turned to the history of discoveries and inventions will relate the exploration of America and the East, or will point to the benefits conferred upon the world by the arts of printing and engraving, by the compass and the telescope, by paper and by gunpowder ; and will insist that at the moment of the Renaissance all these instances of mechanical utility started into existence to aid the dissolution of what was rotten and must perish, to Strengthen and perpetuate the new and useful and life-giving."


Cafe Life Sydney

RRP $40.99

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Australia has evolved from a nation of tea drinkers into one of passionate, true-to-Italian-immigrant espresso consumers.

Cafe culture is carved into Sydney's phenomenal harbour topography and colourful neighbourhood character. From bayside to beachfront, bohemian inner-city areas, student zones and leafy residential areas, each suburb has its own distinct flavour and cafes to match. Cafe Life Sydney explores how espresso culture has percolated up from its Italian roots to be an essential part of Australian lifestyle.

About the Author

Tamara Thiessen has spent the past decade as a freelance foreign correspondent, travel, and cultural writer. Backed by a Masters in international studies and several languages, she has written for a wide range of newspapers and magazines (National Geographic Traveller, Monocle Magazine, Connect Business Travel Magazine, Hotel News Now, Get Lost! Business Traveller, Wanderlust Magazine, Islands Magazine, Conde Nast Traveller, Air Emirates Open Skies & Portfolio, Bthere! Brussels Airline, US Airways Magazine, Delta Sky Magazine, CARLSON Holiday Magazine US, The Melbourne Age, The Sydney Morning Herald, Sunday Business Post, Sunday Herald); she is also the author of the Bradt Travel Guidebook to Borneo (2009) and has worked as a writer and photographer on the Eyewitness Guides to France, Italy, and Australia and to Thames, and Hudson's StyleCity Europe. When she thinks of home, she looks immediately to her suitcase and to the horizon of her next travels.



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Italian Food Italian Wine Italian Cuisine Sydney
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